U.S. Fungal Meningitis Outbreak - Oct. 2012



This documentary, in the form of a Google Map, tracks the actual and potential spread of the October 2012 steroid-related fungal meningitis outbreak, in several U.S. states, as a result of epidural injections for back pain provided by the healthcare facilities identified in this map. Unfortunately the maps provided by the Centers for Disease Control are not specific enough for you to identify if you are at risk. So I mapped the addresses of the healthcare facilities that received the tainted drugs (the yellow push pins) that were identified by the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and matched them up with the states that had actual cases of meningitis (the Red Crosses).

Click here to speed up viewing this map, it will take you to the original Google Map, complete with legend.

Don't panic yet, the CDC is on the job and has enforced a nation-wide recall by the supplier.



IMPORTANT: On 11/29/2012 the CDC Meningitis Classifications just got a lot more complex in FL, IN, MD, MN, MI, MN, NJ, NY, OH, RI, TN & VA. Please see the Waring Sign within the map just above the name "United States."



What is Fungal Meningitis? According to the CDC. "Fungal meningitis is not contagious, which means it is NOT transmitted from person to person. Fungal meningitis occurs when the protective membranes that cover the brain and spinal cord are infected with a fungus.  Fungal meningitis can develop after a fungus spreads through the bloodstream from somewhere else in the body, as a result of the fungus being introduced directly into the central nervous system, or by direct extension from an infected body site next to the central nervous system. Symptoms of fungal meningitis are similar to symptoms of other forms of meningitis, however they often appear more gradually and can be very mild at first.  In addition to typical meningitis symptoms, like headache, fever, nausea, and stiffness of the neck, people with fungal meningitis may also experience confusion, dizziness, and discomfort from bright lights. Patients might just have one or two of these symptoms."

The locations of the actual and potential spread of the disease are identified by the following sources of information:



Disclaimer:
This map, as a public service, was created to simplify obtaining the information you need to know about this healthcare event by putting all the information I could find from reliable sources in a map that localizes the information for you.

Please seek the advice for a healthcare professional before acting on this information. 

MyReadingMapped is not responsible for any inaccuracies in the information this map, and its related web page, obtained from the Centers for Disease Control, or any other authoritative websites; and MyReadingMapped is not affiliated with the Center for Disease Control.


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